To begin, it is important to note that an employer cannot require an employee to be vaccinated for COVID-19. The federal and provincial governments have not made it mandatory for all people to be vaccinated; as such, an employer’s workplace policies cannot make it mandatory.

KEY TAKEAWAYS
• Employers cannot require employees to be vaccinated.
• Employers may ask if an employee has been vaccinated.
• Employers must be mindful of privacy and human rights concerns.

However, an employer may ask an employee if they have been vaccinated. And while this may be regarded as a violation of privacy rights, an employer has an obligation under law to maintain a safe workplace. This obligation overrides any privacy concerns. Having knowledge of which employees have been vaccinated can help an employer determine, among other things, how to assign duties and roles, and which employees are best suited for face-to-face contact with clients. Safety, not only for employees, but for customers as well, is a chief concern for employers who wish to avoid potentially serious liability. Interacting with employees that either lie about or do not wish to disclose their vaccination status or dealing with customers who sue because they contracted COVID-19 after interacting with an infected employee are but a few of the new challenges that businesses are faced with. Thus, it is crucial for an employer to know whether an employee has received any of the recommended vaccination shots.

When collecting such personal information from employees, employers should clearly communicate their reasons, and are advised to be reasonable in their approach, gathering only the amount of information that is necessary. More importantly, an employer must avoid creating a workplace in which non-vaccinated employees are stigmatized, harassed, or bullied. Employers must be mindful that some of their workers may have legitimate reasons for not getting vaccinated – reasons which may be protected under human rights law (e.g., medical or religious reasons).

The collected information is to be kept private and cannot be shared without the consent of the employee. For example, as businesses across Ontario begin to open up, customers may ask about the vaccination status of certain employees, particularly in the hospitality, personal care, and retail sectors. An employer must be cautious not to divulge the personal information of employees that have not consented.

The new COVID-19 landscape is forcing companies to adjust their workplace policies. Moreover, it is forcing business owners to ask uniquely tough questions. For example, can an employer require a new hire to be vaccinated? Can employees be incentivized to get vaccinated? What is the extent of the duty to accommodate and how does it apply to employees who refuse to get vaccinated?

Whether you are an employer or an employee, we would be glad to go into further detail on these recent issues and address any of your concerns.

Feel free to send us an e-mail at info@eruditelaw.com or call us at 905-471-6161 to speak with one of our Employment Law and Civil Litigation practitioners.

Authors: Ben Brillantes

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